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GONORRHEA

ARTICLE HIGH LIGHTS


WHAT IS GONORRHEA


MODE OF TRANSMISSION


SYMPTOMS OF GONORRHEA


TESTS FOR GONORRHEA


PREVENTION OF GONORRHEA:-


TREATMENT OF GONORRHEA


COMPLICATIONS OF GONORRHEA



WHAT IS GONORRHEA
Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). It’s caused by infection with the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae. It tends to infect warm, moist areas of the body, including the: urethra (the tube that drains urine from the urinary bladder) eyes, throat, vagina, anus, female reproductive tract (the fallopian tubes, cervix, and uterus).

MODE OF TRANSMISSION
Gonorrhea passes from person to person through unprotected oral, anal, or vaginal sex. People with numerous sexual partners or those who don’t use a condom are at greatest risk of infection. The best protections against infection are abstinence, monogamy (sex with only one partner), and proper condom usage. Behaviors that make a person more likely to engage in unprotected sex also increase the likelihood of infection. These behaviors include alcohol abuse and illegal drug abuse, particularly intravenous drug use.
A pregnant woman with gonorrhea can give the infection to her baby during childbirth.

 

SYMPTOMS OF GONORRHEA:
Symptoms usually occur within 2 to 14 days after exposure. However, some people infected with gonorrhea never develop noticeable symptoms. It’s important to remember that a person with gonorrhea who doesn’t have symptoms, also called a non-symptomatic carrier, is still contagious. A person is more likely to spread the infection to other partners when they don’t have noticeable symptoms.

A ) Symptoms in men
Men may not develop noticeable symptoms for several weeks. Some men may never develop symptoms.
Typically, the infection begins to show symptoms a week after its transmission. The first noticeable symptom in men is often a burning or painful sensation during urination.

As it progresses, other symptoms may include: –
> greater frequency or urgency of urination
> a pus-like discharge (or drip) from the penis (white, yellow, beige, or greenish)
> swelling or redness at the opening of the penis
> swelling or pain in the testicles
> a persistent sore throat

The infection will stay in the body for a few weeks after the symptoms have been treated. In rare instances, gonorrhea can continue to cause damage to the body, specifically the urethra and testicles. Pain may also spread to the rectum.

B) Symptoms in women
Many women don’t develop any overt symptoms of gonorrhea. When women do develop symptoms, they tend to be mild or similar to other infections, making them more difficult to identify. Gonorrhea infections can appear much like common vaginal yeast or bacterial infections.

Other Symptoms include:
> discharge from the vagina (watery, creamy, or slightly green)
> pain or burning sensation while urinating
> the need to urinate more frequently
> heavier periods or spotting
> sore throat pain upon engaging in sexual intercourse
> sharp pain in the lower abdomen
> fever

TESTS FOR GONORRHEA:-
> GC test
> gonorrhea DNA probe test
> gonorrhea nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)
Healthcare professionals can diagnose gonorrhea infection in several ways. They can take a sample of fluid from the symptomatic area with a swab (penis, vagina, rectum, or throat) and place it on a glass slide. If your doctor suspects a joint or blood infection, he or she will obtain the sample by drawing blood or inserting a needle into the symptomatic joint to withdraw fluid. They will then add a stain to the sample and examine it under a microscope. If cells react to the stain, you most likely have a gonorrhea infection. This method is relatively quick and easy, but it doesn’t provide absolutely certainty. This test may also be completed by a lab technologist.

PREVENTION OF GONORRHEA
The best way to prevent infection with gonorrhea or other STD is to not have sex. But if you are sexually active, you can reduce your risk of infection by
> Being in a long term relationship with one partner who has tested negative for STDs.
> Using condoms correctly every time you have sex.
> You should be tested for gonorrhea every year.

TREATMENT OF GONORRHEA
Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends dual therapy, or using two drugs to treat gonorrhea – A single dose of 250 mg of intramuscular CEFTRIAXONE and 1g of oral AZITHROMYCIN. It is important to take all of the medication prescribed to cure gonorrhea.

COMPLICATIONS OF GONORRHEA
Women are at greater risk of long-term complications from untreated infections. Untreated infection with gonorrhea in women may ascend up the female reproductive tract and involve the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. This condition is known as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and can cause severe and chronic pain and damage the female reproductive organs. PID can be caused by other sexually transmitted diseases as well. Women may also develop blocking or scarring of the fallopian tubes, which can prevent future pregnancy or cause ectopic pregnancy. An ectopic pregnancy is when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus. Gonorrhea infection may pass to a newborn infant during delivery.

Men may experience scarring of the urethra. Men may also develop a painful abscess in the interior of the penis. The infection can cause reduced fertility or sterility.

 

 

NOTE:-
The medical information provided is for informational purpose only, and is not to be used as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your health care provider with questions you may have regarding medical conditions or the interpretation of test results.

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Mukesh Kushwaha is a young Blogger from India. He is a doctor and he is also very passionate about Blogging. His interested areas are HEALTH & FITNESS, and EDUCATION.

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